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As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

 

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decadeAs the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decad

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decadeAs the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decad

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decadeAs the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decad

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.As the ice age ended and the planet warmed, the world’s coastlines assumed their present configuration. There’s a good deal of evidence - much of it now submerged - that this process did not take place slowly and steadily, but, rather, in fits and starts. Beginning around 12,500 B.C., during an event known as meltwater pulse 1A, sea levels rose by roughly fifty feet in three or four centuries, a rate of more than a foot per decade.

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